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A New Simulated Andromeda Galaxy Image Displays WFIRST’s Unique Consolidation of High Resolution and Wide Field of Vision

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A New Simulated Andromeda Galaxy Image Displays WFIRST’s Unique Consolidation of High Resolution and Wide Field of Vision

The upcoming Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) of NASA, set for sendoff in mid-2020s, will be able to have the command to survey sky 1,000 times quicker than Hubble Space Telescope. It will have the quality detail of Hubble, in the near infrared. 

A simulated picture of a 34,000 light-year swath traversing our neighbor galaxy Andromeda displays a unique detector configuration of WFIRST, expansive view field, and high resolution. They generated the picture using data gathered by Hubble, and shows red as well as infrared light of not less than 50 million personal stars in the Andromeda, as they would look with WFIRST. 

WFIRST is built to answer primary questions across the range of a broad topic, including exoplanets, dark energy, and the general astrophysics straddling from our Solar System to far beyond galaxies in observable universe. WFIRST is accumulating not less than four petabytes of information annually, all of which would be non-proprietary and instantly available to the public. 

The simulated picture that characterizes the staggering data amount captured in one pointing in just ninety minutes shows the WFIRST ability to examine large scale structures otherwise too time wasting to picture.  Starwatchers currently use simulations similar to this to plan forthcoming observations. 

Visualize a fleet of a hundred Hubble Space Telescopes, installed in a strategic Space invader shaped array that is a million miles away from the planet Earth, skimming the universe at distorted speed. 

With Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope of NASA, set for launch in the mid-2020, this dream will successfully become a reality. 

The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope will take the equivalent of 100 high resolutions Hubble pictures in one shot, picturing significant areas of sky 1,000 times quicker than Hubble does. In numerous months, WFIRST could study as much of the firmament in close infrared light in just as sufficient detail as Hubble has in its entire thirty years period. 

Elisa Quintana who works as the Deputy Project Scientist at Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope and is in charge of Communications at the Godard Space Flight Center of NASA in Greenbelt, Maryland, is self-assured that WFIRST would have the authority of transforming astrophysics. 

However, WFIRST has not hitherto unlocked its wide, profound eyes on universe, the astronomers are already running the simulations to prove what it would be able to observe and strategize their remarks. 

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